Wealth update – 30/06/2021

June has been a very good month and I’m very excited to write this post.

Holidays

I took two weeks of annual leave but didn’t go anywhere for my holiday as the puppy makes that quite difficult. So it’s a staycation in London where we make the most of our new home and its garden.

The weather has been mostly summery and I’ve been able to meet up with a few friends face-to-face. That was nice. We’ve also been taking our puppy out to explore the great big new world. His tail never tires from wagging… I hope he never grows up.

Deposit drama

We moved earlier this month to another rental flat. As these things go, we had to do an end-of-tenancy cleaning at the previous flat. I was recommended a cleaner by a trusted friend and to our surprise the end-of-tenancy gig only cost £30.

That sounded very cheap as previously it cost £80 for a small studio flat. This was a one-bedroom flat with two toilets. We didn’t argue with a good thing and agreed to the low-low price.

Unfortunately, you get what you pay for. We got the end-of-tenancy inventory report, which stated that the flat was cleaned to a professional standard but had a few specific omissions. Several things needed some extra cleaning (e.g. some limescale in sinks and toilets). Well, fair enough, we’re happy to pay for that as that did need further scrubbing.

What came as a surprise was the amount the agency wanted to deduct from our deposit. They came in at a lofty £195 to do the “necessary” cleaning.

Wow! Greedy much?

Almost £200 to scrub limescale off from a few places? I think an end-of-tenancy cleaning for a 1 bedroom flat would cost around £100 (I did a quick Google search) and they wanted to charge us double that to clean a few specific things? No way.

We disagreed with their quote and they magically reduced it to £120. That was still too much as this was a cost of a full end-of-tenancy cleaning, which the flat did not need. We explained that we are happy to pay for a reasonable amount as the flat does in fact need additional cleaning. They then claimed it was their “standard” cost for cleaning – we rejected that justification as well. So they advised us to take it to the deposit dispute resolution service and we responded that we’d be happy to do so.

I looked into the dispute resolution service and among other things found out that:

Many landlords don’t realise that the onus is on them to prove they have a legitimate claim to a share of the deposit, whilst the tenant has no obligation to prove their position. This is because the deposit remains the tenant’s money until the landlord has successfully proven their claim. It is the landlord’s responsibility to prove damage etc

depositprotection.com

We sort of left it there as I never got around to doing the actual dispute stuff. Luckily, a few days later the agency emailed to say they are happy to reduce their cleaning charges to £80, which we accepted. I thought this will bring our cost to £110, which is what the end-of-tenancy cleaning should’ve cost us anyway.

We then got the majority of our deposit back in the next couple of days. So, that was good for our finances.

The above exchange about the cleaning costs was quite unpleasant. It wasn’t so much about the money as we can afford the initial £195 they wanted but it’s the principle that is important. You can’t charge people inflated “standard” rates plucked out of thin air and greed. We were quite angry about this.

Once our deposit was safely in our bank accounts we pounced on the agency with a letter before action due to them failing to protect our deposit within the statutory time limit of 30 days. In part it’s revenge for all the failures and negative experiences we had renting from them but it’s also an opportunity to make some tax free gains 🙂 .

Taxes

I also did my 2020/21 tax return and got £63.40 back – most of it was a refund due to me claiming the £6 p.w. allowance for working from home all of last tax year. I was planning on claiming loss relief on an EIS investment that went to zero but it turns out that the company is still in business… so I will need to try that again in the future.

However, £63.40 for an hour of work ain’t too bad.

Counting my beans

June was my biggest positive month for my portfolio so far. My net worth as of 30/06/2021 was £232,590 – an increase of £41,087 or 21.5% from the end of May 2021. This is after me making a £1,600 GIA top-up, £411 pension top-up, and £175 was added to my emergency cash pot. I also received my £1,000 LISA bonus in June.

June has been a fantastic month. My gains this month were more than my annual net salary. In just a MONTH! I’m now also solidly above the £200K net wealth figure. In fact I’m now above the average wealth of a UK adult (£210,529 or USD 290,724).

I am very happy.